5 reasons Spider-Gwen is the superhero we need right now

The origin story of Spider-Man is comic legend, but embedded in that universe is another story that yearns to be told.

Mild-mannered teen, Peter Parker, gets bit by radioactive spider and becomes superhero with the power to climb, jump, and zip through the city on webs of his own creation (or that he produces from his wrists, if you're going by the Tobey Maguire films), dates assorted blonds or redheads, and trouble ensues. You get the picture.



Spider-Man doing his thing at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Photo by Brad Barket/Getty Images.

But Gwen Stacy — played by Emma Stone in the recent "The Amazing Spider-Man" films — is more than Peter Parker's first love (yes, sorry, Mary Jane fans, but she was).

In February 2015, the character returned in comic-book form as Spider-Gwen, an ass-kicking superhero from an alternate Marvel universe. "Spider-Gwen" #1 sold nearly 200,000 copies in pre-orders alone, and the one-shot offering was so successful, there's now a Spider-Gwen comic book series!

And while increased representation in comic books is amazing, a hero like Spider-Gwen deserves a place where she can truly shine.

And now we can actually see just how legendary a Spider-Gwen movie could be.

A fan swung in to the rescue with a convincing, fan-made trailer for a Spider-Gwen movie, which was created using clips from "The Amazing Spider-Man" and other Emma Stone films.

Director and fan Alex Coulombe created the three-minute masterpiece for New York Magazine's Vulture Remix series. The trailer imagines what would happen if it were Gwen instead of Peter who got bit by the spider.


Image from New York Magazine.

And it is just the swift kick in the pants this franchise desperately needs.

In fact, here are five reasons Spider-Gwen is the superhero we need right now.

1. If I see one more male superhero getting his own feature film, I will lose my s#!*.

Spider-Man, The Incredible Hulk, Captain America, The Green Lantern, Superman, Batman, Thor, Iron Man, the list goes on. Male superheroes don't just get films, they get franchises. Sequels, reboots, toys, and more, whether the films are strong or not.

Yeah, it should make you mad, Hulk.

Like Wonder Woman and Captain Marvel — who are both getting their own solo films in the next few years — She-Ra, Black Widow, Supergirl, and yes, of course, Spider-Gwen would be fantastic additions to the film canon. A film about any of these badass lady superheroes could easily hold their own with the rest of the summer popcorn blockbusters, if Hollywood gave them the chance.

2. We have so many badass actresses to cast at this very moment.

Emma Stone is the natural choice for this role, but let's not limit ourselves. There are so many talented actresses who could carry the Spider-Gwen mantle with grit and grace. Stars like Zendaya, Chloe Grace Moretz, Amandla Stenberg, and Hailee Steinfeld would crush this.

Amandla Stenberg would make an amazing Gwen Stacy. Photo by Mark Davis/Getty Images for Women in Film.

3. If it comes down to dollars and cents, female-driven films DO make money.

Lots and lots of it. And it turns out, the more female-driven films there are in a year, the higher box office totals are for that year. Yep, when the ladies are manning the ship, all boats rise.


4. Haven't we seen enough Peter Parker?

Apparently not, since we're getting ANOTHER Spider-Man reboot in 2017. How many different ways can we tell this story? Can we see it from a different perspective just once? If not Spider-Gwen, I will also accept bi-racial Spider-Man Miles Morales or Andrew Garfield's request for a pansexual Spidey. Please and thank you.


When the guy who played Spider-Man is like, "Hey, let's shake things up," maybe it's time to listen. Photo by Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images.

5. And won't someone think of the cosplay!

Kids and grown-ups alike deserve to feel this fearless and powerful. Put me down for a Spider-Gwen suit ASAP! That hoodie is amazing.

Cosplayer Julianne Cancalosi fills in for Emma Stone in the imagined "Spider-Gwen" trailer. GIF via New York Magazine.

It's time, Hollywood. The movie-going public is more than ready for a Spider-Gwen film.

We're just waiting on you.

Grab some popcorn and enjoy New York Magazine's "Spider-Gwen" trailer:

The 40-day fasting period of Ramadan observed by Muslims around the world is a both an individual and communal observance. For the individual, it's a time to grow closer to God through sacrifice and detachment from physical desires. For the community, it's a time to gather in joy and fellowship at sunset, breaking bread together after abstaining from food and drink since sunrise.

The COVID-19 pandemic has limited group gatherings in many countries, putting a damper on the communal part of Ramadan. But for one community in Barcelona, Spain, a different faith has stepped up to make the after sunset meal, known as Iftar, as safe as possible for the Muslim community.

According to Reuters, Father Peio Sanchez, Santa Anna's rector, has opened the doors of the Catholic church's open-air cloisters to local Muslims to use for breaking the Ramadan fast. He sees the different faiths coming together as a symbol of civic coexistence.

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"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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