5 reasons Spider-Gwen is the superhero we need right now

The origin story of Spider-Man is comic legend, but embedded in that universe is another story that yearns to be told.

Mild-mannered teen, Peter Parker, gets bit by radioactive spider and becomes superhero with the power to climb, jump, and zip through the city on webs of his own creation (or that he produces from his wrists, if you're going by the Tobey Maguire films), dates assorted blonds or redheads, and trouble ensues. You get the picture.



Spider-Man doing his thing at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day Parade. Photo by Brad Barket/Getty Images.

But Gwen Stacy — played by Emma Stone in the recent "The Amazing Spider-Man" films — is more than Peter Parker's first love (yes, sorry, Mary Jane fans, but she was).

In February 2015, the character returned in comic-book form as Spider-Gwen, an ass-kicking superhero from an alternate Marvel universe. "Spider-Gwen" #1 sold nearly 200,000 copies in pre-orders alone, and the one-shot offering was so successful, there's now a Spider-Gwen comic book series!

And while increased representation in comic books is amazing, a hero like Spider-Gwen deserves a place where she can truly shine.

And now we can actually see just how legendary a Spider-Gwen movie could be.

A fan swung in to the rescue with a convincing, fan-made trailer for a Spider-Gwen movie, which was created using clips from "The Amazing Spider-Man" and other Emma Stone films.

Director and fan Alex Coulombe created the three-minute masterpiece for New York Magazine's Vulture Remix series. The trailer imagines what would happen if it were Gwen instead of Peter who got bit by the spider.


Image from New York Magazine.

And it is just the swift kick in the pants this franchise desperately needs.

In fact, here are five reasons Spider-Gwen is the superhero we need right now.

1. If I see one more male superhero getting his own feature film, I will lose my s#!*.

Spider-Man, The Incredible Hulk, Captain America, The Green Lantern, Superman, Batman, Thor, Iron Man, the list goes on. Male superheroes don't just get films, they get franchises. Sequels, reboots, toys, and more, whether the films are strong or not.

Yeah, it should make you mad, Hulk.

Like Wonder Woman and Captain Marvel — who are both getting their own solo films in the next few years — She-Ra, Black Widow, Supergirl, and yes, of course, Spider-Gwen would be fantastic additions to the film canon. A film about any of these badass lady superheroes could easily hold their own with the rest of the summer popcorn blockbusters, if Hollywood gave them the chance.

2. We have so many badass actresses to cast at this very moment.

Emma Stone is the natural choice for this role, but let's not limit ourselves. There are so many talented actresses who could carry the Spider-Gwen mantle with grit and grace. Stars like Zendaya, Chloe Grace Moretz, Amandla Stenberg, and Hailee Steinfeld would crush this.

Amandla Stenberg would make an amazing Gwen Stacy. Photo by Mark Davis/Getty Images for Women in Film.

3. If it comes down to dollars and cents, female-driven films DO make money.

Lots and lots of it. And it turns out, the more female-driven films there are in a year, the higher box office totals are for that year. Yep, when the ladies are manning the ship, all boats rise.


4. Haven't we seen enough Peter Parker?

Apparently not, since we're getting ANOTHER Spider-Man reboot in 2017. How many different ways can we tell this story? Can we see it from a different perspective just once? If not Spider-Gwen, I will also accept bi-racial Spider-Man Miles Morales or Andrew Garfield's request for a pansexual Spidey. Please and thank you.


When the guy who played Spider-Man is like, "Hey, let's shake things up," maybe it's time to listen. Photo by Tommaso Boddi/Getty Images.

5. And won't someone think of the cosplay!

Kids and grown-ups alike deserve to feel this fearless and powerful. Put me down for a Spider-Gwen suit ASAP! That hoodie is amazing.

Cosplayer Julianne Cancalosi fills in for Emma Stone in the imagined "Spider-Gwen" trailer. GIF via New York Magazine.

It's time, Hollywood. The movie-going public is more than ready for a Spider-Gwen film.

We're just waiting on you.

Grab some popcorn and enjoy New York Magazine's "Spider-Gwen" trailer:

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
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This story was originally shared on Capital One.

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