More

27 heartwarming pics of a man taking his dog on a farewell trip.

Robert is making sure Bella lives out the rest of her days as a happy dog.

27 heartwarming pics of a man taking his dog on a farewell trip.

When Robert Kugler found out his beloved chocolate lab, Bella, had cancer — he knew what he had to do.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.


Robert adopted Bella as a puppy. She's now 9 years old, or about 63 if you're counting in human years.

In May, a veterinarian told Robert that what he initially thought was a shoulder injury was actually cancer and that it had spread to Bella's lungs. The doctor had to amputate one of Bella's legs and told Robert she had three to six months to live.

That was 14 months ago.

Determined to show Bella the same kind of unconditional love she had shown him throughout her life, Robert hit the road to give her the farewell tour of her doggie dreams.

He tells Upworthy it's not everyday you get to just pack up, get behind the wheel, and go, but after losing two siblings in nine years, he began to look at time as being much more valuable than money.

As for Bella, he says, "She teaches me lessons every day, and I am so blessed to spend my time with her."

Here are 27 of the most heartwarming photos from Bella's farewell tour:

1. Bella running on a beach in Florida.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

2. Taking in a sunrise in the Sunshine State.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

3. Trying to stay cool in Tybee Island, Georgia.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

4. Bella getting her "country on" in Nashville, Tennessee.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

5. At Land Between the Lakes in Kentucky and Tennessee.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

6. At the Mark Twain National Forest in southern Missouri.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

7. At the Parthenon in Nashville.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

8. At Blue Ridge Parkway in North Carolina.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

9. Bella making friends with a dog named Timber on a beach in Florida.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

10. At Central Park in New York City

Image by Robert Kugler/Life Illustrated, used with permission.

11. Visiting a fallen firefighter memorial outside the Arkansas State Capitol.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

12. Making friends at summer camp in Missouri.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

13. Posing outside an abandoned barn in Nebraska.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

14. And letting her tongue hang out in Tybee Island.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

15. Here, Bella cools off in a river.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

16. And going swimming in South Beach.

Image by Robert Kugler/Life Illustrated, used with permission.

17. Visiting Savannah, Georgia.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

18. And Neptune Beach in Florida.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

19. And the Southernmost Point Buoy.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

20. Here's Bella being a champion at the Rocky Steps in Philadelphia.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

21. Bella and Robert at the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

22. Outside the original "Cheers" bar in Boston. Do they make beer for dogs?

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

23. At Acadia National Park in Maine.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

24. Taking in Niagara Falls.

Image by Robert Kugler/Life Illustrated, used with permission.

25. Posing in front of "Jaws"-inspired street art in Detroit.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

26. Posing with her best friend, Robert, of course.

Image by Robert Kugler/Life Illustrated, used with permission.

27. And, most importantly, here's Bella enjoying every second of the wind in her face on this amazing road trip with her favorite human.

Image by Robert Kugler/Instagram.

You can't put a price tag on the type of love, loyalty, and companionship a pet provides, and these incredibly moving photographs prove it.

The bond between Robert and his "Bella girl" is truly special. In spite of Bella having cancer and only three legs, Robert says, she begs to be in the car nearly every time she's awake.

You can follow this dynamic duo's road trip adventures on Robert's Instagram, and he says they've got no plans of slowing down anytime soon because "right now ... sharing the love of this dog with the world has become my new purpose."

via Travis Akers / Twitter

A tweet thread by Travis Akers, a Navy Lieutenant with 17 years of service, is going viral because it shows just how sweet children can be and also points to an overlooked issue facing military families.

In the early morning of April 12, Akers tweeted a photo of himself and his seven-year-old son Tanner who he affectionately calls "Munchie." Akers was moved because his son set his alarm clock so he could get up early enough to hand him a pocket full of Legos before work.

Tanner wanted to be sure his father had something to play with at the Naval Station Mayport in Jacksonville, Florida. "This was my daily morning trip to base, departing my house at six am for work," Akers told Upworthy.

Keep Reading Show less
Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less