17 tweets to shine a light on the importance of Roe v. Wade, 45 years later.

The fight is far from over.

It's been 45 years since the U.S. Supreme Court issued its landmark Roe v. Wade ruling, but somehow, the fight over abortion rages on today.

Far from the settled subject one might be led to believe, abortion remains a contentious issue and a driving force in politics. As president, Donald Trump has led the fight against abortion rights, appointing a number of extremist anti-choice judges to federal courts and delivering remarks at the anti-choice "March for Life."

Still, a majority of Americans believe abortion should be legal — a 2017 Pew survey found that 57% of Americans believe abortion should be legal in "all or most cases," with just 16% of those polled saying they believe it should be made illegal.


Abortion rights demonstrators marched through New York in 1977. Photo by Peter Keegan/Keystone/Getty Images.

Roe v. Wade marked an important milestone in reproductive health, and pro-choice groups and individuals took to social media to celebrate the occasion.

Planned Parenthood highlighted the fact that the case was argued by then-27-year-old Sarah Weddington, who made history as the youngest person to argue a successful Supreme Court case.

The Center for Reproductive Rights shared a video highlighting the fight for reproductive justice and sharing the stories of individuals who've had abortions.

The most heartfelt tweets, however, were those from individuals.

Writers Maureen Shaw and Jessica Valenti opened up about their abortions.

Author Jennifer Wright joked about the Trump administration's recent anti-trans and anti-abortion "moral objections" policy at the Department of Health and Human Services. More seriously, she offered her thoughts on what an abortion "might make possible" for those who need it.

NARAL Pro-Choice America president Ilyse Hogue dropped a hard truth: Criminalizing abortions doesn't eliminate them; it only makes them more dangerous.

Others called out the Trump administration's hypocrisy, noting that self-described "small government" politicians had a tendency to be a little too interested in micromanaging what someone does with their uterus, or made the (very reasonable) suggestion that we base public policy on things like science.

Others pointed to some underappreciated aspects of legal abortion: In some cases, it's life-saving.

When writer Mary Elizabeth Williams was diagnosed with cancer, she had to sign a consent form acknowledging that if she became pregnant, she would need to stop treatment.

"I also used birth control, of course, but nothing is foolproof, and rape sometimes happens, too," she wrote in a Twitter direct message. "For what it's worth, any other time in my life, any, I'd found myself pregnant, I would have continued with it ... But leave my kids without a mom or have an abortion? That would have been a no-brainer."

The truth is, as many pointed out, that reproductive health care (including abortion) is health care.

You wouldn't think this would be a controversial thing to say, but you'd be wrong (which is why it's so important to say it).

"Every child should be a wanted child," another Twitter user added. "Every parent should be a willing parent."

Writer and editor Evette Dionne correctly pointed out that "political attacks on abortion are intimately connected to a lack of access to contraception, sex education, and government assistance."

"It is a means of shaming the poor, particularly poor women of color," she added. "We will not go back."

As long as abortion rights are under attack, it's important that we amplify the voices of reproductive justice.

We may be 45 years into the fight, but it's far from over.

An abortion rights demonstrator holds a sign outside the Supreme Court. Photo by Karen Bleier/AFP/Getty Images.

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