15 100-year-old photos that prove beauty is timeless.

A vintage post-card collector on Flickr who goes by the username Post Man has kindly allowed us to share his wonderful collection of vintage postcards and erotica from the turn of the century. This album is full of exquisite photographs from around the world of a variety of people dressed in beautiful clothing in exotic settings. In an era well before the internet, these photographs would be one of the only ways you could could see how people in other countries looked and dressed.

Take a look at PostMan's gallery of over 90 vintage postcards on Flickr.


Vintage erotica c. 1920

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

Japanese woman c. 1913

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Maude Ewing Adams Kiskadden an American stage actress c. 1895

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Cambodian girl c. 1906

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Vintage erotica  c. 1913

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Beduinin woman c. 1919

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Japanese woman c. 1920

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Gypsy girl with Mandolin c. 1911

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Luzon Woman c. 1909

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Nepalese lady c. 1905

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Vietnamese woman c. 1908

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Vintage erotica  c.1919

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Actress Anna May Wong  c. 1927

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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English actress Lily Elsie c. 1909

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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Two women from Bou-Saâda c. 1911

Photo courtesy of Flickr user Post Man

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