14 compliments that have nothing to do with looks and everything to do with being an amazing human

Artist Caroline Caldwell is my new favorite human being.

She decided that people needed some ideas for how to compliment each other on things besides looks and physical appearance.

Why? Well ... the whole looks-complimenting thing is kinda played out dontcha think?


So she collaborated with fellow artist-writer Van Nguyen and bam.

Here are her non-physical appearance ideas, and I love them.

Used with permission from artist Caroline Caldwell. By the way, getting permission is a great way to compliment an artist! Just sayin'. Caroline's other fabulous works that I INSIST you check out are on her website Dirt Worship.

Just read these through a couple times and enjoy, then head on over to her site. Go on. I'll wait.

I'm writing them all out (with her permission, natch) so we can memorize them all and make the world a more fun place. You in?

Here we go.

COMPLIMENTS THAT ARENT ABOUT PHYSICAL APPEARANCE

1. You're empowering.

2. I never thought fannypacks could look cool 'til you.

3. You're strong.

4. I'm so happy you exist.

5. It's nice to see such kindness.

Can I just say if anyone told me this, I would do an emotional cartwheel???

6. I hope we know each other for a long time.

7. I bet if Britney Spears knew you, 2008 would've gone a lot differently.

Oh man. This one hits me (baby, one more time) close to home and my 2008 heart. <3 you, Brit!

8. I would trust you with my passwords.

9. You call your grandmom the exact right amount.

10. You inspire me to be a better person.

11. Your ideas matter.

12. You have great taste in ______.

Sandwiches? Friendly baristas in your neighborhood? Weird American tourist spots? You get me.

13. You're so fun to talk to.

Especially if you're giving these amazing compliments! Geez!

14. I bet you're amazing at chess.

I'm so bad at chess but I like that you think I'd be good at it. Yes, I'm responding to this art like it's a person, so what?! :)

Ahhh. That felt good. We all deserve to be seen (and complimented) like this.

Imagine what it would feel like to be walking down the street and get one of these?

Better yet, imagine what it would feel like to give one? Well, you don't have to imagine. You have the words, you have the heart, you have the power, you have the force!

Go on out there and get to complimenting! Who knows what might happen.

And be on the look out for these compliments. Here's hoping we hear many more of them. <3

Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

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via The Walt Disney Company / Flickr

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Courtesy of CeraVe
True

"I love being a nurse because I have the honor of connecting with my patients during some of their best and some of their worst days and making a difference in their lives is among the most rewarding things that I can do in my own life" - Tenesia Richards, RN

From ushering new life into the world to holding the hand of a patient as they take their last breath, nurses are everyday heroes that deserve our respect and appreciation.

To give back to this community that is always giving so selflessly to others, CeraVe® put out a call to nurses to share their stories for a chance to be featured in Heroes Behind the Masks, a digital content series shining a light on nurses who go above and beyond to provide safe and quality care to patients and their communities.

First up: Tenesia Richards, a labor and delivery nurse working in New York City who, in addition to her regular job, started a community outreach program in a homeless shelter that houses expectant mothers for up to one year postpartum.

Tenesia | Heroes Behind the Masks presented by CeraVe www.youtube.com

Upon learning at a conference that black mothers in the U.S. die at three to four times the rate of white mothers, one of the widest of all racial disparities in women's health, Richards decided to take further action to help her community. She, along with a handful of fellow nurses, volunteered to provide antepartum, childbirth and postpartum education to the women living at the shelter. Additionally, they looked for other ways to boost the spirits of the residents, like throwing baby showers and bringing in guest speakers. When COVID-19 hit and in-person gatherings were no longer possible, Richards and her team found creative workarounds and created holiday care packages for the mothers instead.

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