More

13 more illustrations of the daddy-daughter bond that will melt your heart.

If you liked Soosh's first set of daddy-daughter photos, you'll love these.

Not too long ago, an artist named Soosh took the web by storm with her paintings depicting dad and daughter relationships. Now she's back with more.

Soosh, as she's affectionately known, is an extremely talented painter with a very compelling story. Her father wasn't a big part of her life growing up, and that still haunts her to this day. But now she's turning a negative into a positive by creating illustrations that show how a dad should interact with his daughter.

The main goal is to inspire her 9-year-old son to be a good man and father in the future, and in doing so, she ended up inspiring many people when her artwork hit the mainstream on Instagram and her website.


"The positive reaction makes me feel so good," Soosh told Upworthy. "You always kinda presume there are many good people in the world, but when you have the chance to make sure it's true, it's like a revelation."

But even though Soosh's artwork is extremely popular, it doesn't have a 100% approval rating.

Why is the dad so big?

It makes no sense that you only draw fathers. Where is the mother?

Those are two of the most common critiques Soosh receives from the outside, and she's here to drop some knowledge those people.

"The father is so big because he represents the huge importance of loving parent or family member in a child's life. And the little girl, who happens to be me, represents a child's need for love, protection, and support. This documents what I hoped for my own personal experience, but in reality, it doesn't matter if it's a mother or father, because the universal message here is about love. No matter who gives it."

And with that, here are 13 more heartwarming illustrations that perfectly describe the daddy-daughter relationship.

1. Dads know how to get busy in the kitchen.

All illustrations are provided by Soosh and used with permission.

2. And they aren't afraid to learn new skills if it means making their kids happy.

3. They know their limitations when it comes to playing hide and seek.

4. They also know the importance of teaching their daughters to hold their ground, no matter what.

5. And they are always willing to accept treatment for all external or internal wounds.


6. Dads know that you don't have to do much to enjoy a quality bonding experience.

7. It can be a simple shadow puppet show.


8. Or the occasional costume party.

9. But dads know that when they work late, there will be crushed little ones at home who miss them.


10. So they do everything possible to be present for every precious milestone and moment.

11. Including bath time.

12. Or when love is discovered.

13. Because when it comes to being a dad, the snuggle is real.



And this, my friends, is what fatherhood should look like today and everyday.

Let's Do More Together

A Boston couple moved into a new place the week of lockdown. Here’s how they kept their sanity.

The new litmus test for domestic partnerships? A pandemic.

For medical workers in a pandemic, protecting loved ones can be tricky.

To support this effort and other programs like it, all you have to do is keep doing what you're doing — like shopping for laundry detergent. Turn your everyday actions into acts of good every day at P&G Good Everyday.

True

When Jonathan Irons was 16, he was put on trial for burglary and assault with a weapon. According to CBS Sports, Irons was tried as adult, and an all-white jury found him guilty—despite there being no witnesses, no fingerprints, no footprints, and no DNA proving his guilt.

Irons began his 50-year sentence in a Missouri state prison in 1998. Now, 22 years later, he's a free man, largely thanks to the tireless efforts of a WNBA superstar.

Maya Moore is arguably the most decorated professional women's basketball player in the U.S. A first-round draft pick in 2011, she's played for the Minnesota Lynx, where she became a six-time WNBA All-Star, a five-time All-WNBA First Team player, a four-time WNBA champion, and the WNBA Most Valuable Player in 2014.

But before the 2019 season, in the peak of her career, Moore decided to take the year off for a different kind of court battle—one that had wrongfully convicted a young man and doomed him to spend most of his life behind bars. Her decision rocked her sport, and there was no guarantee that sacrificing an entire season to fight for criminal justice reform would bear any fruit.

Keep Reading Show less