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12 touching photos from Santa's visit to a refugee shelter in Germany.

Old St. Nick made a pit stop in Sarstedt, Germany on Christmas Eve.

No matter where he is in the world, Santa Claus appears to be a popular guy.

Case in point: His recent visit to a shelter for migrants and refugees in Sarstedt, Germany, on Christmas Eve. The facility has been a temporary home for those from war-torn Syria and Afghanistan.

Santa's pit stop there shows that, regardless of where they are in the world, children go through the same stages of excitement when Santa comes to town.


1. First, there's the anxious waiting for his arrival.

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

St. Nick really can't come soon enough.

2. And then, of course, more waiting to get a good glimpse.

Patience is a virtue, kids.

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

3. But when he finally arrives? Euphoria.

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

4. Don't forget, though: making kids happy makes Santa happy too.

I mean, just look at the way he's joyously ringing those bells.

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

5. And when Santa's in town, kids understand it probably means he won't come empty-handed.

That's right ... presents!

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

If anyone deserves a few gifts, it's these kids.

Refugee children go through what many of us can't even imagine. Because of conflicts in the Middle East, they've been ripped away from their friends, their communities, and sometimes even their parents. UNICEF estimates that 2.2 million Syrian children have been affected by war in their native country.

Most basic necessities — like clean water, food, quality shelter, and medical care — are difficult to come by for these kids, and many of their families are looking ahead at an uncertain 2016.

6. So yeah ... they deserve some gifts.

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

7. Seriously. These kids deserve everything under the tree.

...and then some.

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

8. So, who's the mystery man behind Santa's mustache?

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

He's a Syrian migrant living in Germany, and he simply wanted to spread some holiday cheer.

Thousands like him in Germany have volunteered in recent months to lend a helping hand to those living in shelters, according to Getty. It's no surprise, either — Germany has been among the most generous to Syrian refugees in the wake of their civil war, Bloomberg reported.

In fact, this year, the European country is expected to take in more refugees from Syria than the U.S. will accept from the entire world (despite Germany being a much smaller country, both geographically and by population).

9. The next best thing Santa gives away besides gifts? Warm hugs, of course.

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

10. And don't forget about group photos (that all the parents can appreciate).

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

11. Judging from all the smiles (on the faces of both kids and their parents), I'd say Santa's stop in Germany was a success.

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

12. Thank you, St. Nick, for remembering to bring some holiday cheer to the families that need it most this season.

Photo by Alexander Koerner/Getty Images.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


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