11 celebrity tweets in favor of Michelle Obama's new girls' rights initiative
True
Gates Foundation

Michelle Obama has had an eventful few days in New York City.

She set out for the Big Apple right after helping host Chinese President Xi Jinping for a state dinner on Sept. 25, 2015...


Photo by Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images.

So that she could hug Beyoncé on stage at the Global Citizen Festival the very next day...


And then get cozy with Stephen Colbert on "The Late Show" on Sept. 28, 2015.


But the first lady's Big Apple travels, as you may have guessed, weren't just about hanging out with celebs and posting the evidence online (although, would anyone blame her?). She was there to deliver an important message.

Obama was getting the word out about her new #62MillionGirls campaign, which promotes girls' education around the world.

Photo by Justin Tallis/AFP/Getty Images.

The campaign — launched on Sept. 26, 2015, as a part of Obama's broader Let Girls Learn initiative — is focused on helping more girls around the world complete high school by building awareness and investing in existing government initiatives, like the Peace Corps, to prioritize girls' education. Because that 62 million figure represents a sad reality: the number of girls, globally, who lack access to education.

The first lady wrote about why that number is so disproportionately high:

"Many of [those girls] simply can't afford the school fees, or the nearest school is miles away, and they don't have safe transportation to get there, or maybe there's a school nearby, but it doesn't have adequate bathroom facilities for girls. And for many girls, the obstacles they face aren't just about resources, but about cultural norms and traditions that deem girls unworthy of an education."

A key point of the #62MillionGirls campaign is rallying support from the Internet.

Obama has encouraged supporters to share a photo of themselves telling the world what they learned in school.


And the campaign surely hasn't struggled to get support from Hollywood.

Celebs have tweeted out their support in droves (and many used adorable old school pics to do it). Several of them have been retweeted by the first lady.

Here are some of the best ones:

1. Stephen Colbert


2. Kerry Washington

3. Mindy Kaling


4. Charlize Theron


5. Usher Raymond


6. Bellamy Young


7. Chris Martin


8. Leonardo DiCaprio


9. Hilary Swank


10. Dianna Agron


11. Bono


These pics are more than just celebrity eye candy.

(Although, let's get real: Little Mindy Kaling is just beyond cute.) They represent a vital movement that's near and dear to the first lady's heart.

"As I've traveled the world, I have met so many of these girls — and they are so bright, so determined, and so eager to learn," she wrote. "I see myself in these girls. I see my daughters in these girls. These girls are our girls, and I simply cannot walk away from them."

Join the first lady's campaign by tweeting a photo of yourself and sharing what you learned in school using #62MillionGirls.

Photo by Louis Hansel on Unsplash
True

This story was originally shared on Capital One.

Inside the walls of her kitchen at her childhood home in Guatemala, Evelyn Klohr, the founder of a Washington, D.C.-area bakery called Kakeshionista, was taught a lesson that remains central to her business operations today.

"Baking cakes gave me the confidence to believe in my own brand and now I put my heart into giving my customers something they'll enjoy eating," Klohr said.

While driven to launch her own baking business, pursuing a dream in the culinary arts was economically challenging for Klohr. In the United States, culinary schools can open doors to future careers, but the cost of entry can be upwards of $36,000 a year.

Through a friend, Klohr learned about La Cocina VA, a nonprofit dedicated to providing job training and entrepreneurship development services at a training facility in the Washington, D.C-area.

La Cocina VA's, which translates to "the kitchen" in Spanish, offers its Bilingual Culinary Training program to prepare low-and moderate-income individuals from diverse backgrounds to launch careers in the food industry.

That program gave Klohr the ability to fully immerse herself in the baking industry within a professional kitchen facility and receive training in an array of subjects including culinary skills, food safety, career development and English language classes.

Keep Reading Show less

This article originally appeared on 12.02.19


Just imagine being an 11-year-old boy who's been shuffled through the foster care system. No forever home. No forever family. No idea where you'll be living or who will take care of you in the near future.

Then, a loving couple takes you under their care and chooses to love you forever.

What could one be more thankful for?

That's why when a fifth grader at Deerfield Elementary School in Cedar Hills, Utah was asked by his substitute teacher what he's thankful for this Thanksgiving, he said finally being adopted by his two dads.

via OD Action / Twitter

To the child's shock, the teacher replied, "that's nothing to be thankful for," and then went on a rant in front of 30 students saying that "two men living together is a sin" and "homosexuality is wrong."

While the boy sat there embarrassed, three girls in the class stood up for him by walking out of the room to tell the principal. Shortly after, the substitute was then escorted out of the building.

While on her way out she scolded the boy, saying it was his fault she was removed.

RELATED: A gay couple's pride flag helped give a young teen the courage to come out to their family

One of the boy's parents-to-be is Louis van Amstel, is a former dancer on ABC's "Dancing with the Stars." "It's absolutely ridiculous and horrible what she did," he told The Salt Lake Tribune. "We were livid. It's 2019 and this is a public school."

The boy told his parents-to-be he didn't speak up in the classroom because their final adoption hearing is December 19 and he didn't want to do anything that would interfere.

He had already been through two failed adoptions and didn't want it to happen again.

via Loren Javier / Flickr

A spokesperson for the Alpine School District didn't go into detail about the situation but praised the students who spoke out.

"Fellow students saw a need, and they were able to offer support," David Stephenson said. "It's awesome what happened as far as those girls coming forward."

RELATED: A homophobic ad was placed next to a pizza shop. They messed with the wrong place.

He also said that "appropriate action has been taken" with the substitute teacher.

"We are concerned about any reports of inappropriate behavior and take these matters very seriously," Kelly Services, the school the contracts out substitute teachers for the district, said in a statement. "We conduct business based on the highest standards of integrity, quality, and professional excellence. We're looking into this situation."

After the incident made the news, the soon-to-be adoptive parents' home was covered in paper hearts that said, "We love you" and "We support you."

Religion is supposed to make us better people.

But what have here is clearly a situation where a woman's judgement about what is good and right was clouded by bigoted dogma. She was more bothered by the idea of two men loving each other than the act of pure love they committed when choosing to adopt a child.