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10 things you probably didn't know about vaginas

What do sharks and vaginas have in common?

10 things you probably didn't know about vaginas

You are getting very ... informed. #hypnotizedbyfacts

Let's break that down.

Laci Green made a super-interesting list (with details in the video at the bottom) of some of the little-known facts about vaginas. Like what?


Like...

1. The vagina is a lot like a sock (but not because you should put feet in it).


It's because of how it's shaped! It's a pathway of muscles that's flat when nothing is in it. And there's a top that keeps things from getting lost.

2. Vagina is Latin for ... SWORD HOLDER? Haha. That's kind of funny.

I'm just gonna let that register for a sec.

3. The V can get an E too. E stands for erection.



A vagina can expand 200% when it's turned on. SERIOUSLY.

4. Can you *really* pop that cherry? Nah.



5. VAGINAS AND SHARKS.

Have you ever heard of squalene? I sure hadn't. Laci explains it at 1:27.

6. Whatchu know about the G-spot?

It's not a mystery! It sits about two inches inside the vagina. Go find it. (Or don't.)

7. Do vaginas with teeth actually exist? Oh my.

Just to say it: She doesn't say yes, but she also doesn't really say no either. There have been cases of teeth in ovaries and in utero!

8. Vaginal orgasms are way less common than clitoral.

Only 25% of women get them, yo.

9. 1 in 5,000 female babies is born without a vagina. It's true.

It's called vaginal agenesis. I didn't know much about it, but she does a good job explaining what it is and how it can be treated.

10. Vaginal confidence is important because duh! It's your BODY!


The human body is kinda weird, right? Or maybe we've just made it seem that way because we generally don't talk about certain parts of it ... like the "private" parts, especially. But maybe we should? Talking about our body parts shouldn't be embarrassing. We're sorta stuck with them. We're all unique. It's life. And when you learn to embrace your differences, that's when you really get to start being yourself. Just a thought!

All about this list in just 3 minutes and 41 seconds:

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via Jessica Jade / Facebook

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Learn more on how cities are taking action: c40.org/divest-invest


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