What would it sound like if men got the lame advice we give to working moms?

Listen up, ladies. Y'all just don't know how hard it is to be a working dad these days.

We're expected to do it all. Raise the little ones, pay the bills, look "sexy," be assertive in our career (but not too assertive), and somehow get it all done in time to have dinner on the table for the wife and kids.

Wait. That doesn't sound right.


GIF from "Family Matters."

Real talk: Being a parent of any gender is really hard, but it's the moms who get all the extra pressure and all the horrible advice that goes along with it.

Seriously, go Google "tips for working moms," start reading, and try not to break something. There's oodles of advice out there for everything, from how to stay organized, to how to make time for your avocado-filled beauty routine, to how to set proper boundaries at work.

Most of it is well-meaning and all, but you can't help but wonder, what would it look like if we tried to give this same kind of advice to working dads?

Hmm...

A hilarious parody Twitter account recently began skewering this kind of misguided advice for moms, and it's a must-follow.

The tweeter known as @manwhohasitall began tweeting in August and has shared over 3,200 delightful nuggets of wisdom since then. (Working dads sure do need a lot of help!)

In his or her own words, the author (who wanted to remain anonymous ... and in character, at that) told Upworthy, "I offer supportive lifestyle advice for the frazzled working dad juggling housework, kids, job, 'me time' and truly great skin."

It's got something for everyone, including cleverly disguised thoughts on the unbelievably low standards we set for dads who "help" with the kids...


Why we feel that women somehow need permission to have confidence...


Some fantastic advice on how to spend our precious "me time" (the author prefers to spend theirs "in a candlelit bubble bath with a full glass of water and maybe an almond")...


And plenty more. Just enjoy these for a moment:






"I'll be honest with you," the author told Upworthy. "It's tough being a working dad. There's so much pressure to look good, keep a perfect house, and stay hydrated."

Once you've recovered from rolling on the floor laughing, you don't have to look too hard to see the underlying point here.

Go check out the rest of these amazing "tips." And when you're done with that, be sure to reward yourself with some much needed "me time."

I'll be spending mine scrubbing the floor, exfoliating, and chanting self-affirmations.

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In 1945, the world had just endured the bloodiest war in history. World leaders were determined to not repeat the mistakes of the past. They wanted to build a better future, one free from the "scourge of war" so they signed the UN Charter — creating a global organization of nations that could deter and repel aggressors, mediate conflicts and broker armistices, and ensure collective progress.

Over the following 75 years, the UN played an essential role in preventing, mitigating or resolving conflicts all over the world. It faced new challenges and new threats — including the spread of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction, a Cold War and brutal civil wars, transnational terrorism and genocides. Today, the UN faces new tensions: shifting and more hostile geopolitics, digital weaponization, a global pandemic, and more.

This slideshow shows how the UN has worked to build peace and security around the world:

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Malians wait in line at a free clinic run by the UN Multidimensional Integrated Mission in Mali in 2014. Over their 75 year history, UN peacekeepers have deployed around the world in military and nonmilitary roles as they work towards human security and peace. Here's a look back at their history.

Photo credit: UN Photo/Marco Dormino

via Tom Ward / Instagram

Artist Tom Ward has used his incredible illustration techniques to give us some new perspective on modern life through popular Disney characters. "Disney characters are so iconic that I thought transporting them to our modern world could help us see it through new eyes," he told The Metro.

Tom says he wanted to bring to life "the times we live in and communicate topical issues in a relatable way."

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The amount of e-waste we produce each year is growing at an increasing rate, and the improper treatment and disposal of this waste is harmful to both human health and the planet.

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Here's what had happened. Evans apparently had shared a video in his Instagram stories that somehow ended with an image of his camera roll. Among the tiled photos was a picture of a penis. No idea if it was his and really don't care. Clearly, it wasn't intentional and it appears the IG story was quickly taken down.

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Schools often have to walk a fine line when it comes to parental complaints. Diverse backgrounds, beliefs, and preferences for what kids see and hear will always mean that schools can't please everyone all the time, so educators have to discern what's best for the whole, broad spectrum of kids in their care.

Sometimes, what's best is hard to discern. Sometimes it's absolutely not.

Such was the case this week when a parent at a St. Louis elementary school complained in a Facebook group about a book that was read to her 7-year-old. The parent wrote:

"Anyone else check out the read a loud book on Canvas for 2nd grade today? Ron's Big Mission was the book that was read out loud to my 7 year old. I caught this after she watched it bc I was working with my 3rd grader. I have called my daughters school. Parents, we have to preview what we are letting the kids see on there."

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