Tiffany Jenkins has a way of making mental health struggles both relatable and hilarious.

If you aren't yet familiar with Tiffany Jenkins, you'll want to be. The viral video sensation and refreshingly real mother of three behind Juggling the Jenkins has a new video that anyone who struggles with multiple mental health issues, or knows someone with mental health issues (which is all of us), can relate to.

The video, titled "IF MY BRAIN HAD A MORNING MEETING . . .", starts with Jenkins clad in glasses, holding a clipboard, wearing a t-shirt labeled "BRAIN."


"Good morning, everybody," says Brain. "Thank you for being here." Then she looks around for a moment and says, "Where is Motivation?"

The camera then switches to Anxiety, who says, "Motivation's never here," followed by a camera switch to Forgetfulness who scoffs, "Even I get to the meetings in the morning, and I'm Forgetfulness."

And so begins a conversation between Jenkins' various mental health struggles, which includes other characters such as Depression, Addiction, Socially Awkward, and "Procrast—" (Procrastination, who arrives to the meeting late and hasn't finished writing out its name—GENIUS.)

"So..." says Brain, after describing Jenkins' busy day ahead. "How can we f*ck this up?"

The various personas of mental illnesses and tendencies working together to sabotage Jenkins' day make this video feel all too real. After asking how they're going to f*ck up Tiffany's day, Procrastination tells Brain that she's "already on it."

"Last night, she wanted to lay out the kids' clothes so she was, like, ready in the morning or whatever," says Procrastination, "and I convinced her to watch 'The Walking Dead' instead."

Anxiety freaks out when she finds out that beloved Walking Dead character Glenn died in the show. But Brain reminds Anxiety that she wasn't there the night they watched that episode, Depression was. And she "did a great job," says Brain. "She didn't get out of bed for two days after Glenn died."

Anxiety brings it back to ruining Jenkins' day with, "I can...um...I can remind her of all of the crap that she has to do." Brain nods and says, "Same as always—'You gotta do this, you gotta do that,' but say it in a really panicked voice so she gets really overwhelmed. Good, Anxiety."

Then Depression, with her disheveled ponytail and black eyeliner, drones, "I'll come in and drain her desire to do it."

"Yes, Depression. Good idea," says Brain. "This is good. I like how we're working as a team, guys."

For people who battle their own thoughts every day, it can often feel like their brain is conspiring against them.

I won't give away the whole thing (you can watch it below), but the video is clearly resonating with people. It's garnered more than 3.5 million views and 90,000 shares on Facebook in less than 24 hours. Commenters say it's like Jenkins is looking into their heads and eavesdropping on their internal dialogue. One commenter wrote "This is the sequel to 'Inside Out' I always wanted to see."

Jenkins has gained popularity both through her humor and her honesty about her journey with drug addiction. She has a knack for tapping into the reality of mental illness and helping both those who struggle and those who don't understand it a bit better.

Check it out:

IF MY BRAIN HELD A MORNING MEETING.....

Posted by Juggling The Jenkins on Monday, November 19, 2018

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