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This Is Why Women's Hygiene Companies Shouldn't Let Teen Boys Run Their Marketing Teams

Playtex Products (not to be confused with the entirely separate Playtex bra company) decided to run an edgy ad campaign (if you define middle-school lady-part jokes to be "edgy") for "Fresh + Sexy wipes", a private parts washcloth. I haven't confirmed who wrote the ads, but the only rational explanation is that some vice president there thought that letting his teenage son who loves porn and has no understanding of women should be given free reign over a campaign for feminine hygiene products. Cheap puns are easy, but tolerable. Shaming women about their sex organs... not so much. 

For the woman in your life who loves her private parts as much as a Benny Hill sketch:


For the lady who loves trashy novels and purity balls:

For the frat boy who manstrates:

For the – never mind, this is just gross. Fire them already.

You can let them know how awful their ads are here because they don't allow comments on their Facebook wall here.

UPDATE: Some commenters have also pointed out that these adult wet wipes are actually unhealthy for you. The thing with wipes and douches is that 9 out of 10 of them will cause pH imbalances (resulting in itchiness, odor, discharge, dryness, and in extreme cases, bacterial vaginosis.) So not only are they poorly made, juvenile and uncreative, they are actually something women should actively avoid for health reasons. Good times.

via UNSW

This article originally appeared on 07.10.21


Dr. Daniel Mansfield and his team at the University of New South Wales in Australia have just made an incredible discovery. While studying a 3,700-year-old tablet from the ancient civilization of Babylon, they found evidence that the Babylonians were doing something astounding: trigonometry!

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This article originally appeared on 09.08.16


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