Wikipedia / Vogue U.K.

Beauty magazines are notorious for removing perceived "imperfections" from their photos of women, but these perceived flaws are what make each individual beautiful and unique. So when Meghan Markle became the first-ever guest editor during British Vogue's 103-year history, she had one specific request for the cover image: leave the freckles.

The cover photo of British Vogue's "Forces for Change" issue features 15 strong women who come"from all walks of life, each driving impact and raising the bar for equality, kindness, justice and open mindedness." Women such as Adwoa Aboah, Jane Fonda, New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern, Jameela Jamil, Laverne Cox, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Selma Hayek are all on the cover. So are their freckles and beauty marks.

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Photo from Dole
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As you sit down to eat your breakfast in the morning or grab an afternoon snack, take a minute to consider your food, how it was made, and how it got to your plate.

The fruit on your plate were grown and picked on farms, then processed, packaged and sent to the grocery store where you bought them.

Sounds simple, right?

The truth is, that process is anything but simple and at every step in the journey to your plate, harm can be caused to the people who grow it, the communities that need it, and the planet we all call home.

For example, thousands of kids live in food deserts and areas where access to affordable and nutritious food is limited. Around the world, one in three children suffer from some form of malnutrition, and yet, up to 40% of food in the United States is never eaten.

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