The Jussie Smollett case left everyone's heads spinning back in January when the (former) Empire actor claimed to have been the victim of a horrific homophobic and racist hate crime, in which he said two attackers tied a noose around his neck and poured bleach on him while shouting racist and homophobic slurs and yelling "MAGA country." But then in a wildly dramatic turn, the actor was arrested and charged with making the whole thing up. To make matters even more confusing, Chicago prosecutors then decided to drop all 16 charges against him just a few days after he was indicted for allegedly faking a hate crime. The turn of events left everyone with a lot more questions than answers. And finally, we have some answers, after nearly 500 previously sealed court documents from the case were opened to the public this week, Vulture reports.

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When non-essential businesses in NYC were ordered to close in March, restaurants across the five boroughs were tasked to pivot fast or risk shuttering their doors for good.

The impact on the city's once vibrant restaurant scene was immediate and devastating. A national survey found that 250,000 people were laid off within 22 days and almost $2 billion in revenue was lost. And soon, numerous restaurant closures became permanent as the pandemic raged on and businesses were unable to keep up with rent and utility payments.

Hot Bread Kitchen, a New York City-based nonprofit and incubator that has assisted more than 275 local businesses in the food industry, knew they needed to support their affiliated businesses in a new light to navigate the financial complexities of shifting business models and applying for loans.

According to Hot Bread Kitchen's CEO Shaolee Sen, shortly after the shutdown began, a third of restaurant workers that they support had been laid off and another third were furloughed.

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