An "alt-right" children's book featuring a popular cartoon character recently found itself at the center of a heated legal debate.

Earlier this year, a Texas assistant principal named Eric Hauser wrote and published a right-wing children's book called "The Adventures of Pepe and Pede." The story follows the two characters, a frog named Pepe and a centipede named Pede as they celebrate the end an oppressive farmer's eight years of rule and work to make their farm great again in his absence.

There's more to the plot, which has been criticized as being Islamophobic, but it's essentially a send-up of our current political climate told from the point of view of some of Trump's most dedicated supporters. If Pepe the Frog sounds familiar, that's because he's become a meme popular on right-wing blogs.

Keep Reading Show less
More

Thanks to U.S. copyright laws, nothing has entered the public domain in nearly 40 years.

This year's new free public works include Anne Frank's diary, 'The Sound of Music,' and much, much more — unless you live in America.

Every year on Jan. 1, hundreds of copyrights enter the public domain like a New Year's gift to the world, making them free to use for absolutely any reason.

Let's back up a second. Copyrights cover the span of intellectual and creative properties — everything from movies, books, and songs to software, industrial designs, and scientific concepts.

But these protections don't last forever.

Keep Reading Show less
Most Shared

We can learn a lot from the fashion industry. And I don't mean how to do a blind stitch, useful as that may be.

When it comes to ideas, fashion companies do something very different from a lot of other industries that may sound like a bad idea, but it's actually what makes them better at what they do.

Keep Reading Show less
More