Mallory Weggemann has been a competitive swimmer since she was 7 years old. But her future as an athlete took an unexpected turn when she was 18.

In 2008, she went to the hospital to receive her third and final epidural injection that was supposed to help with debilitating post-shingles back pain. Instead, 18-year-old Weggemann was left a paraplegic with complete loss of movement from her abdomen down.

Determined to return to swimming, she was back in the pool just three months later. Her older sister found an article in the local newspaper about the Paralympic Swimming Trials at the University of Minnesota.

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31 powerful reasons people are protesting at the Women's March.

For the past, the present, and the future, people share their reasons for marching.

In an unprecedented rebuke to the inauguration of President Donald Trump, hundreds of thousands of people took to the streets and marched on Washington, D.C. — and around the world — on Jan. 21, 2017.

On his first full day in office, the Women's March on Washington drew demonstrators from across the country — men, women, and children alike — to fight back against harmful rhetoric and campaign proposals Trump has promised.

Hundreds of thousands of protesters descend on Washington, D.C., for the Women's March. Photo by Jim Watson/AFP/Getty Images.

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She can't marry the love of her life. The reason? She'd lose her health insurance.

For one woman, getting married is a life or death choice.

This story was originally published on The Mighty.

Imagine having to choose between your life and marrying your significant other.

I have two rare chronic illnesses, Blau syndrome and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. Both of these illnesses require extensive testing, blood work, appointments, and inpatient infusions on a regular basis.

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