Atlanta-based CreativeSoul Photography brought an inspiring artistic vision to life that highlights the beauty of black girls and their natural hair.

Regis and Kahran are the husband-and-wife duo behind the photography studio, and their series "Afro Art" represents their expertise in capturing portraits as well as visual storytelling. The striking images feature young girls in elaborate costuming and hairstyles, from a Baroque-era aesthetic to steampunk clothing to fierce high-fashion ensembles.

The girls featured in "Afro Art" are stylish and carry themselves with confidence and grace. The feelings evoked from the series speak to the larger idea surrounding it. “We feel that it is so important for kids of color to be able to see positive images that look like them in the media,” Kahran told My Modern Met in an email. “Unfortunately the lack of diversity often plays into the stereotypes that they are not ‘good enough’ and often forces kids to have low self-esteem.”

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For generations, black parents have sat down with their children to have "the talk."

My mother had "the talk" with me when I was 7. One of my teachers intentionally lowered the grades on my report card to "keep me humble." I cried. My parents fumed. That's when I knew there was something different about being black.

My experience is not unique. One study revealed non-white parents are three times more likely to talk about race than white parents. Acknowledging race and racism is an early and frequent occurrence in black households.

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When Shila Burney's 17-year-old son Michael leaves the house, she insists that his phone's GPS is turned on.

Burney trusts her son and his friends, but she doesn't make this request lightly.

The Burneys are black. As a mother of a black son, Shila worries about the strangers and situations Michael may run into that he can't control. If something goes wrong, she says, "How quickly can I get there — to him?"

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