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Anxiety affects everyone differently. These comics offer some great coping tips.

Comic artist Sara Zimmerman drew her daily struggles with a little 'shoulder monster' called anxiety.

Anxiety affects everyone differently. These comics offer some great coping tips.

Anxiety is pretty common in adults.

It's so common, in fact, that it affects about 18% of us40 million adults ages 18 to 54 — in the U.S. every year.

Though anxiety looks different on everyone, it is typically a normal reaction to stress. However, for some people, anxiety can become excessive, and it can have debilitating effects. Post-traumatic stress disorders and obsessive-compulsive disorders are just a few of the most common types of anxiety disorders that millions of Americans experience during their adult life.  


To explain what anxiety really feels like for some people, comic artist Sara Zimmerman, from Unearthed Comics, drew some of her daily struggles with the little "shoulder monster."

Here are a few:

1. Sleeping in is usually something to look forward to. But anxiety can make that a little more difficult.

Comics via Sara Zimmerman, Unearthed Comics. All images used with permission.

2. Having anxiety means sometimes having to relive parts of childhood we'd rather forget.  

3. There are some other side effects of anxiety that you probably don't want around.    

4. Staying motivated can be challenging because anxiety has a tendency to try to block hopes and dreams.  

5. The fear of being alone can be overwhelming.  

6. But sometimes, even the slightest distraction can deflect the worst of anxiety.  

7. If the distraction is big enough, you may even find room to continue going after those hopes and dreams — sans anxiety and fear tag-alongs.

8. However, with the right tools, it's possible to find a way to live well with anxiety.

Anxiety can be really difficult to deal with — that's not up for debate.

But using strategies like finding an experienced therapist, eating healthy meals, getting adequate sleep, and exercising are all helpful in learning to live well despite those pesky anxiety bugs. You can do it!

Photo courtesy of Macy's
True

Macy's and Girls Inc. believe that all girls deserve to be safe, supported, and valued. However, racial disparities continue to exist for young people when it comes to education levels, employment, and opportunities for growth. Add to that the gender divide, and it's clear to see why it's important for girls of color to have access to mentors who can equip them with the tools needed to navigate gender, economic, and social barriers.

Anissa Rivera is one of those mentors. Rivera is a recent Program Manager at the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc., a nonprofit focusing on the holistic development of girls ages 5-18. The goal of the organization is to provide a safe space for girls to develop long-lasting mentoring relationships and build the skills, knowledge, and attitudes to thrive now and as adults.

Rivera spent years of her career working within the themes of self and community empowerment with young people — encouraging them to tap into their full potential. Her passion for youth development and female empowerment eventually led her to Girls Inc., where she served as an agent of positive change helping to inspire all girls to be strong, smart, and bold.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Inspiring young women from all backgrounds is why Macy's has continued to partner with Girls Inc. for the second year in a row. The partnership will support mentoring programming that offers girls career readiness, college preparation, financial literacy, and more. Last year, Macy's raised over $1.3M for Girls Inc. in support of this program along with their Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math (STEM) programming for more than 26,000 girls. Studies show that girls who participated are more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, score higher on standardized math tests, and be more equipped for college and campus life.

Thanks to mentors like Rivera, girls across the country have the tools they need to excel in school and the confidence to change the world. With your help, we can give even more girls the opportunity to rise up. Throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases or donate online to support Girls Inc. at Macys.com/MacysGives.

Who runs the world? Girls!

via 2C2K Photography / Flickr

Scientists in India have made a major medical breakthrough by producing the first "thermostable" variety of insulin that doesn't need to be refrigerated. The research was led by two scientists from the Bose Institute and the Indian Institute of Chemical Biology (IICB) and two others from the Indian Institute of Chemical Technology (IICT).

This development is fantastic news for diabetics because it will make it a lot easier for them to store this life-saving medication. The product labels from all three of America's insulin manufacturers state that insulin should be stored in a refrigerator at approximately 36°F to 46°F.

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Photo courtesy of Macy's
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Did you know that girls who are encouraged to discover and develop their strengths tend to be more likely to achieve their goals? It's true. The question, however, is how to encourage girls to develop self-confidence and grow up healthy, educated, and independent.

The answer lies in Girls Inc., a national nonprofit serving girls ages 5-18 in more than 350 cities across North America. Since first forming in 1864 to serve girls and young women who were experiencing upheaval in the aftermath of the Civil War, they've been on a mission to inspire girls to kick butt and step into leadership roles — today and in the future.

This is why Macy's has committed to partnering with Girls Inc. and making it easy to support their mission. In a national campaign running throughout September 2021, customers can round up their in-store purchases to the nearest dollar or donate online to support Girls Inc. and empower girls throughout the country.


Kaylin St. Victor, a senior at Brentwood High School in New York, is one of those girls. She became involved in the Long Island affiliate of Girls Inc. when she was in 9th grade, quickly becoming a role model for her peers.

Photo courtesy of Macy's

Within her first year in the organization, she bravely took on speaking opportunities and participated in several summer programs focused on advocacy, leadership, and STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). "The women that I met each have a story that inspires me to become a better person than I was yesterday," said St. Victor. She credits her time at Girls Inc. with making her stronger and more comfortable in her own skin — confidence that directly translates to high achievement in education and the workforce.

In 2020, Macy's helped raise $1.3 million in support of their STEM and college and career readiness programming for more than 26,000 girls. In fact, according to a recent study, Girls Inc. girls are significantly more likely than their peers to enjoy math and science, to be interested in STEM careers, and to perform better on standardized math tests.

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