A dad’s hilariously cute doctor visit with his son went viral for all the right reasons.

World, meet Debias.

Photo courtesy of Antwon Lee.

He's a little guy from Georgia currently making the internet swoon.


Debias and his dad, Antwon Lee, have been best buds since Debias was born this past August.

Photo courtesy of Antwon Lee.

Sometimes dads need to put being "best buds" on the back burner, though, and put on their parenting caps instead.

Like last month, when it was time for Debias to get his vaccinations.

Photo courtesy of Antwon Lee.

A video of Antwon and Debias at the doctor's office — filled with lots of laughs, tears, and hugs — has gone viral. And it's no wonder why.

"We're going to get these shots; I want you to look at me now," Antwon reassures his son in the video, giving Debias an encouraging pep talk. "You're gonna be good."

The video captures a candid, vulnerable moment between a father and son: "I know you're gonna cry," Antwon tells him. "But it's OK to cry. It'll be OK. It's OK to cry."

The heartwarming video turns to mostly laughs at about the 1:20 mark, though, when the actual injections begin. "Man, I know, man!" Antwon says, hugging a shrieking Debias. "Are you videotaping this?" the medical professional says, laughing. "I hope you are."  

Antwon posted the private moment to Facebook after the doctor's visit. But a friend, recognizing how great the video truly was, encouraged him to change the settings on Facebook so the public could see it.

The tender moment took off, amassing nearly 15 million views as of Nov. 2. "Good Morning America" featured the video on its Facebook page as well, garnering Antwon and Debias lots of positive attention.

"I didn’t expect it to blow up like this, to be honest with you," Antwon explains. "I didn’t even know [my girlfriend] was videoing it.”

The response to the video has been overwhelming and amazing, Antwon says, especially from fathers.

Strangers — many of them fathers themselves — have reached out to him, telling him how encouraging it was to see a vulnerable dad and his emotional son experiencing the tears that come with those early doctor visits together.  

The comments section of the video was filled with love for the two of them, with some users praising Antwon's ability to be an emotionally supportive dad when his son needed it most. It's refreshing for many users, it seems, to see a dad tell his son it's OK to cry.

Photo courtesy of Antwon Lee.

“It feels peaceful," Antwon, a first-time dad, says of fatherhood. "It’s been beautiful. I got me a beautiful, peaceful baby."

And even though the world now knows Debias as a tearful baby in a doctor's office, ironically, crying is a rarity around the house, Antwon notes. "He don't cry unless he wants his ball," the dad says with a laugh.

❤️

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