This stay-at-home mom's post about 'not working' has been shared over 400,000 times.

The number of stay-at-home moms is on the rise in America. From 1967 to 1999, the country saw a gradual decline in moms who stay home, but over the past nine years, the trend has reversed.

A Redbook study found that 90 percent of stay-at-home moms are happy with their domestic career, but that doesn't mean their work is any easier.

Florida mother and tattoo artist, Ryshell Lynch, wrote a Facebook post on the incorrect perceptions surrounding stay-at-home mothers, and it's been shared over 400,000 times.


By Ryshell Lynch/Facebook

The post is a hypothetical conversation between a psychologist and a father who complains that his stay-at-home wife, “doesn't work."

During the exchange, the psychologist uncovers the unbelievable amount of work the mother does, even after the father comes home and rests after his full-time job.

Conversation between a husband (H) and a psychologist (P):


P: what do you do for a living Mr. Rogers?


H: I work as an accountant in a bank.


P: Your wife?


H: She doesn't work. She's a housewife.


P: Who makes breakfast for your family?


H: My wife, because she doesn't work


P: What time does your wife wake?


H: She wakes up early because it has to be organized. She organizes the lunch for the children, ensures that they are well-dressed and combed, if they had breakfast, if they brush their teeth and take all their school supplies. She wakes with the baby and changes diapers and clothes. Breastfeeds and makes snacks as well.


P: How do your children get to school?


H: My wife takes them to school, because she doesn't work.


P: After taking their children to school, what does she do?


H: Usually takes a while to figure something out that she can do while she is out, so she doesn't have to pack and unpack the carseat too many times, like drop off bills or to make a stop at the supermarket. Sometimes she forgets something and has to make the trip all over again, baby in tow. Once back home, she has to feed the baby lunch and breastfeed again, get the baby's diaper changed and ready for a nap, sort the kitchen and then will take care of laundry and cleaning of the house. You know, because she doesn't work.


P: In the evening, after returning home from the office, what are you doing?


H: Rest, of course. Well, I'm tired after working all day in the bank.


P: What does your wife do at night?


H: She makes dinner, serves my children and I, washes the dishes, orders once more the house, makes sure the dog is put away as well as any left over dinner. After helping children with HW she gets them prepared to sleep in pajamas and the baby is in fresh diapers, gives warm milk, verifies they brush their teeth. Once in bed she wakes frequently to continue to breastfeed and possibly change a diaper if needed while we rest. Because she doesn't have to get up for work.


-This is the daily routine of many women all over the world, it starts in the morning and continues until the wee hours of the night... This is called “doesn't work"?!


Being a housewife has no diplomas, but has a key role in family life!


Enjoy and appreciate your wife, mother, grandma, aunt, sister, daughter... Because their sacrifice is priceless.


Somebody asked her…


You are a woman who works or is it just “housewife"??


She replied:


I work as a wife of the home, 24 hours a day..


I am a mother,


I am a woman,


I am a daughter,


I'm the alarm clock,


I'm the cook,


I'm the maid,


I am the master,


I'm the bartender,


I'm the babysitter,


I'm a nurse,


I am a manual worker,


I'm a security officer,


I'm the adviser,


I am the comforter,


I don't have a vacation,


I don't have a licence for disease.


I don't have a day off


I work day and night,


I'm on duty all the time,


I do not receive salary and...


Even so, I often hear the phrase:


“but what do you do all day?"


Dedicated to all the women who give their lives for the welfare of their families


The woman is like salt:


Her presence is not remembered, but its absence makes everything left without flavor.


Share with all the beautiful ladies of your life.
True

Anne Hebert, a marketing writer living in Austin, TX, jokes that her closest friends think that her hobby is "low-key harassment for social good". She authors a website devoted entirely to People Doing Good Things. She's hosted a yearly canned food drive with up to 150 people stopping by to donate, resulting in hundreds of pounds of donations to take to the food bank for the past decade.

"I try to share info in a positive way that gives people hope and makes them aware of solutions or things they can do to try to make the world a little better," she said.

For now, she's encouraging people through a barrage of persistent, informative, and entertaining emails with one goal in mind: getting people to VOTE. The thing about emailing people and talking about politics, according to Hebert, is to catch their attention—which is how lice got involved.

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Hebert isn't working with a specific organization. She is simply trying to motivate others to find ways to plug in to help get out the vote.

Photo by Phillip Goldsberry on Unsplash

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