Heroes

Someone Give This Man A Nobel Prize Already. He’s Going To Save The Planet!

Thisman, Allan Savory, once bought into a lie that everyone accepted blindly. Thislie resulted in something horrible happening, which he supported at the time.But now he has a mission. A simple and beautiful mission: SAVE. THE. PLANET.He’s going to do it, too. Watch and be in awe.

Someone Give This Man A Nobel Prize Already. He’s Going To Save The Planet!
Some highlights:

At 0:49, he lays out how big a problem we're facing with climate change. In case you forgot.
At 1:20, learn what desertification means and why it's an important word to add to your vocabulary.
At 2:17, you get a satellite view of desertification.
At 2:52, see why rainfall isn't enough to change deserts back to grasslands.
At 3:20, learn about the role carbon plays in all of this.
At 4:12, he tells us THE lie we're all told and accept, like how people used to accept that the world was flat. Sidebar: I love how he pronounces "methane."
At 5:30, he talks about one of his biggest mistakes.
At 6:42, see how that mistake motivates him to make one of the most important scientific discoveries of our generation.
Beginning at 7:30, learn how changing microclimates is really global climate change and how no one really understood the threat of desertification...
... until now, at 9:00.
At 9:50, see how grasslands change (and die).
At 10:40, learn why solving this with fire is a bad idea and why we need to stop burning 1 billion hectares of grassland in Africa every year.
At 11:30, he points out all the things we've tried and what our ONLY option is now. People, this is how we're going to heal the world.
At 12:20, he's enacted his solution and shows you what it looks like.
At 13:03, but, how do you mimic nature's herds in the 21st century?
At 14:10, he manages to come up with a holistic process that helps locals increase crop yield.
At 15:00, this is the start of the most relief-inducing before and after pics you'll ever see.
At 16:50, his mic-drop-worthy moment will blow you away.
At 17:11, see the faces of the families he's helping.
At 18:50, he says that desertification may be a worse force of climate (and social) change than fossil fuels.
At 19:30, but we can fix it. And we will.
At 19:50, I think I screamed "AMEN" when he got here.
And finally at 20:56, you get to hear a response to a bonus question that may have been on your mind.

Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

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Images courtesy of John Scully, Walden University, Ingrid Scully
True

Since March of 2020, over 29 million Americans have been diagnosed with COVID-19, according to the CDC. Over 540,000 have died in the United States as this unprecedented pandemic has swept the globe. And yet, by the end of 2020, it looked like science was winning: vaccines had been developed.

In celebration of the power of science we spoke to three people: an individual, a medical provider, and a vaccine scientist about how vaccines have impacted them throughout their lives. Here are their answers:

John Scully, 79, resident of Florida

Photo courtesy of John Scully

When John Scully was born, America was in the midst of an epidemic: tens of thousands of children in the United States were falling ill with paralytic poliomyelitis — otherwise known as polio, a disease that attacks the central nervous system and often leaves its victims partially or fully paralyzed.

"As kids, we were all afraid of getting polio," he says, "because if you got polio, you could end up in the dreaded iron lung and we were all terrified of those." Iron lungs were respirators that enclosed most of a person's body; people with severe cases often would end up in these respirators as they fought for their lives.

John remembers going to see matinee showings of cowboy movies on Saturdays and, before the movie, shorts would run. "Usually they showed the news," he says, "but I just remember seeing this one clip warning us about polio and it just showed all these kids in iron lungs." If kids survived the iron lung, they'd often come back to school on crutches, in leg braces, or in wheelchairs.

"We all tried to be really careful in the summer — or, as we called it back then, 'polio season,''" John says. This was because every year around Memorial Day, major outbreaks would begin to emerge and they'd spike sometime around August. People weren't really sure how the disease spread at the time, but many believed it traveled through the water. There was no cure — and every child was susceptible to getting sick with it.

"We couldn't swim in hot weather," he remembers, "and the municipal outdoor pool would close down in August."

Then, in 1954 clinical trials began for Dr. Jonas Salk's vaccine against polio and within a year, his vaccine was announced safe. "I got that vaccine at school," John says. Within two years, U.S. polio cases had dropped 85-95 percent — even before a second vaccine was developed by Dr. Albert Sabin in the 1960s. "I remember how much better things got after the vaccines came out. They changed everything," John says.

Keep Reading Show less