Mansplaining: An awesome comic breaks down the definition — and shares examples.

If you're living in 2018, you've probably encountered mansplaining — the word or, unfortunately, the real thing.

What is mansplaining? Are you doing it? And what do you do when you find yourself up against a mansplainer?

Luckily, the good folks over at The Nib are here with handy answers to all three — in delightful comic form.


"Mansplaining, Explained": "The last guy I dated was a real mansplainer."

"Mansplaining, Explained": "'Mansplainer.' I never get that word."

"Mansplaining, Explained": "Luckily, I've been on enough dates to prepare for this situation."

"Mansplaining, Explained": "It's a word that describes a pattern of behavior in our culture."

Mansplaining is a word that describes a pattern in our society of overlooking and dismissing women's knowledge, experiences, and voices.

Many men grow defensive when they're accused of mansplaining, but it's not a direct attack on any one individual. Rather, it describes a pervasive cultural trend that almost all women face throughout their lives.

"Mansplaining, Explained": Author Rebecca Solnit

Whether or not an individual man is guilty of mansplaining, the truth remains that it's near impossible for women and girls to make it through life without coming up against it.

It happens in classrooms, universities, and even in instances where a woman has demonstrably more experience and knowledge on a topic than men present.

"Mansplaining, Explained": "In elementary school classes, boys call out answers eight more times than girls."

"Mansplaining, Explained": "A 2004 study found the same pattern persisted at Harvard Law."

"Mansplaining, Explained": "Patients are twice as likely to interrupt a female doctor."

"Mansplaining, Explained": Trump interrupts Clinton multiple times during their first debate.

Mansplaining can also be seen when women's voices are conspicuously absent from cultural conversations — especially when the topic pertains to gender or women's rights.

"Mansplaining, Explained": #MeToo

It's important to remember that mansplaining isn't the only type of cultural silencing that occurs in society.

All minorities find themselves silenced at some point or another by majority groups.

The best way to solve mansplaining and other oppressions is to make sure you're listening to all parties — and if the parties aren't present, question why and fix it.

"Mansplaining, Explained": "Who has a power and a platform in our society isn't just about gender."

"Mansplaining, Explained": Who's speaking? Whose voices are we missing?

This comic was originally published by The Nib and is reprinted here with permission.

True

If the past year has taught us nothing else, it's that sending love out into the world through selfless acts of kindness can have a positive ripple effect on people and communities. People all over the United States seemed to have gotten the message — 71% of those surveyed by the World Giving Index helped a stranger in need in 2020. A nonprofit survey found 90% helped others by running errands, calling, texting and sending care packages. Many people needed a boost last year in one way or another and obliging good neighbors heeded the call over and over again — and continue to make a positive impact through their actions in this new year.

Upworthy and P&G Good Everyday wanted to help keep kindness going strong, so they partnered up to create the Lead with Love Fund. The fund awards do-gooders in communities around the country with grants to help them continue on with their unique missions. Hundreds of nominations came pouring in and five winners were selected based on three criteria: the impact of action, uniqueness, and "Upworthy-ness" of their story.

Here's a look at the five winners:

Edith Ornelas, co-creator of Mariposas Collective in Memphis, Tenn.

Edith Ornelas has a deep-rooted connection to the asylum-seeking immigrant families she brings food and supplies to families in Memphis, Tenn. She was born in Jalisco, Mexico, and immigrated to the United States when she was 7 years old with her parents and sister. Edith grew up in Chicago, then moved to Memphis in 2016, where she quickly realized how few community programs existed for immigrants. Two years later, she helped create Mariposas Collective, which initially aimed to help families who had just been released from detention centers and were seeking asylum. The collective started out small but has since grown to approximately 400 volunteers.