UPDATE: CNBC pulled the video for "copyright violations" from Sen. Warren's YouTube channel. They have the longer segment here at their site.

UPDATE 2: CNBC reached out to comment, and had the following to say:

"Again, we think that the clip featuring Senator Warren is well worth watching which is why it has been available to view in multiple locations on CNBC.com since its original posting. The original, copyrighted video clip, like all others on CNBC.com, can be embedded on any third party site through our video player."

Unfortunately, their embed system doesn't work on mobile and tends to break sites, so I've made them aware of the issue. They have graciously uploaded the clip to their YouTube channel to accommodate us and you can watch it below. I start it from when the original clip started, but you can rewind and hear everything Sen. Warren had to say prior to clip start by clicking on the start of the timeline.

However, this raises a larger question. Aren't senators allowed to share clips of themselves on TV? What provoked them to pull this specific post down? I would think that would be a case of fair use.

I've written to the CNBC team and will update when/if they respond again.

In the interim, I've decided to be a good neighbor to CNBC and find some other copyright pirates for them. Like Sen. Roberts, or Sen. Crapo, or Sen. Burr, or Sen. Moran, or Sen. Landrieu, or Sen. Sanders, or Sen. Rubio, or Sen. Barrasso, or Sen. Blunt, or Sen. Portman, or Sen. McConnell, or Sen. Reed, or Sen. Shelby, or Sen. Merkley, or Sen. McCain, or Sen. Johnson, or Sen. Ayotte, or Sen. Voinovich, or Sen. Carper, or that dastardly Sen. Warren.

CNBC's Jim Cramer tweeted about the interview and seemed to counter his own network's concerns about its caliber.

So why did they take it down leaving all those others there?

Speaking of which, I sure am a fan of said Sen. Warren. You could share this if you think that maybe people on TV should learn facts before talking about things they don't understand. Totally up to you.

If you click the tweet button below, you can ask CNBC why they filed a copyright claim against a senator for simply engaging in lively and thoughtful debate.

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